Using relative dating what can geologists determine

The combination of these two types of geologic ages makes a complete record of earth's geologic history in terms of the order of events and in terms of how many years ago each event occurred.Relative geologic age refers to the order in which geologic events occurred.From the beginning of this course, we have stated that the Earth is about 4.6 billion years old.How do we know this and how do we know the ages of other events in Earth history?By measuring the amount of the parent and daughter isotopes in a crystal, and then applying the decay rate, the actual age in years since the rock crystallized can be calculated.Check out this video on the Uranium – Lead dating method: Biostratigraphy is a relative dating method that correlates rock ages using the fossils contained within rock units.The units commonly used for geologic age are mega-annum (Ma) for millions of years, giga-annum (Ga) for billions of years, and kiloannum (ka) ka for thousands of years.Because these units are used according to the rules of the metric system, the M in Ma and the G in Ga must be capitalized, and the k in ka must not be capitalized.

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There are different ways that scientists can measure geological time.The goal of this lecture is come to come to a scientific understanding of geologic time and the age of the Earth.In order to do so we will have to understand the following: To better understand these concepts, let's look at an archeological example: Imagine we are a group of archeologists studying two different trash pits recently discovered on the Tulane University campus and at the Audubon Zoo (where they all aksed for you).These radioactive isotopes are parent isotopes, which decay slowly to daughter isotopes, changing the rock’s isotopic character.The rate at which the isotopes decay is in effect our "geological clock".

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